Editor: The Washington Post holds its neologism contest every year.
The contest asks readers to supply alternate meanings for common words.

Following are the winners from a year with a particularly good crop of submissions.

1. Coffee (n.), the person upon whom one coughs.
2. Flabbergasted (adj.), appalled over how much weight you have gained.
3. Abdicate (v.), to give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.
4. Esplanade (v.), to attempt an explanation while drunk.
5. Willy-nilly (adj.), impotent.
6. Negligent (adj.), describes a condition in which you absent mindedly answer the door in your nightgown.
7. Lymph (v.), to walk with a lisp.
8. Gargoyle (n.), olive-flavoured mouthwash.
9. Flatulence (n.) emergency vehicle that picks you up after you are run over by a steamroller.
10. Balderdash (n.), a rapidly receding hairline.
11. Testicle (n.), a humorous question on an exam.
12. Rectitude (n.), the formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists.
13. Pokemon (n), a Rastafarian proctologist.
14. Oyster (n.), a person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms.
15. Frisbeetarianism (n.), (back by popular demand): The belief that, when you die, your Soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there.
16. Circumvent (n.), an opening in the front of boxer shorts worn by Jewish men.

My favorite lighting design  neologism is from the Simpson’s. After looking at his father’s horrible attempt putting up Christmas lights, Bart Simpson looks at the holiday lights outside the house and says, “It’s craptacular.”

Ah… I can’t wait till next year to see the next batch of winners

In addition the Washington Post’s Style Invitational asked readers to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter to supply a new definition. Here are this year’s winners:

1. Bozone (n.) The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.
2. Cashtration (n.) The act of buying a house, which renders the subject financially impotent for an indefinite period.
3. Giraffiti (n) Vandalism spray-painted very, very high.
4. Sarchasm (n) The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit & the person who doesn’t get it.
5. Inoculatte (v) To take coffee intravenously when you are running late.
6. Hipatitis (n) Terminal coolness.
7. Osteopornosis (n) A degenerate disease. (This one got extra credit.)
8. Karmageddon (n) It’s like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it’s like, a serious bummer.
9. Decafalon (n.) The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you.
10. Glibido (v) All talk and no action.
11. Dopeler effect (n) The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly.
12. Arachnoleptic fit (n.) The frantic dance performed just after you’ve accidentally walked through a spider web.
13. Beelzebug (n.) Satan in the form of a mosquito that gets into your bedroom at three in the morning and cannot be cast out.
14. Caterpallor (n.) The color you turn after finding half a grub in the fruit you’re eating.

And the pick of the lot is:*Ignoranus (n): A person who’s both stupid and an  *______.

Before you travel join IAMAT a low-cost non-profit medical help organisation. Carry your membership ID card with you. If you need Medical help show your ID and use IAMAT recommended hospitals and doctors. Read the health tips in the IAMAT website in advance.

Consult your Physician in advance. They will recommend if advance shots or other precautions are needed.

On the IAMAT website “Select your travel destinations, and get an instant, personalized guide to our medical services and comprehensive travel health information for the countries you are visiting. Print a copy or save securely for future online access. The Travel Health Planner is also accessible on your mobile!”

Personal Plumbing Management Tips for Diarrhea:

1. Bactrim (proper names Co-trimoxazole or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole)
Kills a lot of common GI bugs. https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Bactrim
Ask you Physician. You may want to get a prescription before you travel.

2. Loperamide (aka brand name Imodium) Think temporary chemical cork…
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Loperamide

3. Gastrolite Fizzy Tablets or powder you add in a glass of water to replace lost electrolytes.
http://www.drugs.com/cons/gastrolyte.html Many sports drinks have electrolyte replacements.

For more travel tips read Gulliver the Economist‘s Travel blog here.  http://www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver

Need help when you travel? Simple walk into a hotel, smile and ask the Concierge anything you want. They have heard all the questions tourists have asked before, and will have all answers to help you! Have a good trip!

Babies undergoing phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia, have eye masks to prevent risk of UV exposure and to eliminate risk of retinopathy of prematurity. Lights in neonatal wards are not allowed on 24 hours a day. Direct & bare lamp use is not allowed.

Phototherapy lamps used have a special phosphor coatings only for bililights. As an added precaution the bililights I designed use a museum quality acrylic UV filter.

Newer medical research indicates a slight shift in action spectrum may speed photo therapy. LEDs can be used for this phototherapy. Much research has found them to be as effective as the special fluorescent bililamps, however as LEDs have a more pronounced spectral peak, it may be possible that superior combination of LEDs and phosphors may replicate a faster reacting action spectrum.

LEDs can offer similar, if not the same phototherapy as the best fluorescent bililamps, but as all lights dim in brightness as they age, control algorithms for LEDs can ensure maintained light levels are delivered for a 15 year bililight source service lives. This is not yet being done for phototherapy but I trust testing may soon start.

Both terms and their effects, need simultaneous review when discussing LED performance decline over time.

Depreciation commonly is used to refer to the decline in brightness over time as a light source is used, known as lamp lumen depreciation.

LEDs also degrade.

Degradation, many may think of chemical decomposition but there is also elegant degradation. One or both of these conditions seems commonly referred to, and one or both, may occur at the same time.

LED performance depreciates over time as less lumens are emitted. The more any light is used, the more a light source brightness dims over time.

LED lumen depreciation can be solely due to heat conditions. Research has verified this independent of LED operation.

Evidence of LED lamp lumen depreciation is useful, however we know in addition to lumen deprecation, LED Kelvin CCT (Correlated Color Temperature) changes over time.  If change in apparent colour appearance of an LED, and lumen depreciation are plotted at the same point, we can see how these changes may parallel each other in some LED sources, while for others, they may be independent.

Decline in LED lamp lumens and colour temperature change over time varies between manufacturers. It seems sensible to test LED Kelvin CCT measurements and plot them at the same time as Lumen measurements are taken when LED life performance testing is conducted.

Carpenters know measure twice, cut once.
So what happened with the luge track design?

The IOC may consider the track safe but the absence of barriers to prevent collision with columns certainly seems like negligent design.

I recall the Toronto Don Valley Parkway where lighting columns were installed in front of roadside crash barrier guard rails, when they should have been installed behind the barriers. Morton Shulman the Toronto Coroner made a strong case for negligent design in this case. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardiner_Expressway

Vertical protection against collision with columns needs immediate installation, no need to wait for any lengthy inquiry.

Warning: Graphic footage of fatal crash at luge track.
See video here: http://bit.ly/a1BzVG

Killer Columns

LED lumen maintenance curves decline due to LED use and thermal conditions.

All lamp lumen performance declines due to use. Lumen maintenance curve decline is also affected by the number of times a lamp is turned on & off, the thermal environment of the lamp and luminaire, and lamp ballast/driver electronics.

New research shows LED lumen performance declines due to heat without LEDs being turned on. During testing LEDs were turned on only for short duration lumen measurement data collection.

This has large implications for exterior LED lighting where high ambient temperatures are present, as is typically found inside luminaires exposed to direct sunlight during daytimes when luminaires are not on.

The higher the ambient temperature, the faster LED lumen performance declines. Not all high brightness LEDs perform the same way.  Different manufacturer’s LEDs exhibit different rates of decline.  Variation in lumen performance decline must be due to differences in LED manufacture technique and material.

I am interested to review Electron microscopic time-elapse images & data collected at different points along the lumen maintenance curve. No doubt, there is something new to discover to improve manufacturing technique & fabrication for more robust LEDs.

Skype 4.1 Update Tip